Monday, July 17, 2017

Herpes IgG Test Results Interpretation




Herpes IgG test result
Herpes IgG Test
Herpes IgG tests are one type of blood test for the herpes simplex virus (HSV). Herpes blood tests look for the body's immune reaction to a herpes infection. They don't search directly for the virus. Because the immune reaction takes time to develop after the time of infection, it's not immediately detectable. In fact, depending on the type of test used, it can take up to four months to become positive on an HSV IgG test. Tip: If you have herpes symptoms, go to the doctor right away. Sores can be tested directly. You don't have to wait for the immune system to respond. This type of testing can be more accurate if the sore is tested quickly enough.

Herpes IgG Test Results Interpretation


Much of our recent updated information on IgG index values came from direct conversations with our top researchers, Dr. Larry Corey and Dr. Anna Wald at the University of Washington, and Terri Warren at Westover Heights Clinic. Therefore there are no internet articles to link to.

When the virus enters our system, antibody begins to form. This is what the IgG test looks for. The usual key looks like this: less than 0.9 = negative 0.9-1.09 = unequivocal more than 1.09 = positive Low Positives (1.09-3.5): However, studies have shown that the IgG isn't completely reliable between 1.09-3.5. A number in that range is considered a "low positive," and according to our best clinician, Terri Warren, about half of these turn out to be false positives. Definitive Positives (3.5+): Once the index number hits 3.5, however, it's highly likely to be definitive. This will likely not occur until a few weeks following transmission - often 3-4 months or so. According to Dr. Larry Corey at the University of Washington, at some point after this, the antibody load in our systems "plateau." After this, any fluctuations in the index value of a subsequent IgG test really doesn't have anything to do with the antibody load in our systems. These fluctuations usually have more to due with lab conditions and methodology.

Can the IgG tell me when I contracted the virus?



Because our immune functions differ so much from one another, there is really no way to correlate an IgG index value with any kind of a timeline for diagnosis, except in one instance: a negative IgG in tandem with a positive PCR DNA swab test. This would indicate a fairly recent infection - probably less than 4 months old. The IgG is negative at this point because it is too early after transmission for our antibodies to have generated enough to trigger a positive result. However the positive PCR DNA swab is irrefutable proof that the virus is present.

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